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  Displaying results from GEOGRAPHIC-REGION >> AFRICA

3 Key Takeaways From the Nairobi Summit on ICPD25
UN Foundation

The recent Nairobi Summit on ICPD125 gathered nearly 10,000 health and rights advocates to highlight and make a pledge to the work that needs to be done in the upcoming years for the future of girls, women, and the world. During the summit, more that…

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Cape Town Isn’t South Africa’s Only City With Water Problems
Global Citizen

With Cape Town on the verge of becoming the world’s first major metropolis to run out of water, international attention has turned to the city’s efforts to prevent Day Zero. But throughout South Africa, several other major cities are also at risk of running dry due to years of drought, inadequate infrastructure, and excessive water use, according to reports by researchers and municipal water departments.

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Send Safi and Dieynabah a message of support
ONE.org

Safi and Dieynabah, 18, are trailblazers. They have fought hard to stay in school and get a good education.It hasn’t been easy. They were both under pressure to get married – but refused – and persuaded their parents to let them stay in school. That alone is a huge achievement, but it doesn’t stop there.

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Why Are 20 Million People Still At Risk Of Famine?
TAHRAT SHAHID

On World Food Day, a day dedicated to fighting world hunger, the possibility of famine continues to loom large in Africa. Since my post on famine early this year, over 20 million people in Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan, and Yemen remain at risk of dying of starvation, including 1.4 million children. Thanks to humanitarian assistance, however, South Sudan is no longer in the midst of famine – but the risk that it will return to famine conditions has yet to be eliminated.

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How one man is connecting Kakuma refugee camp to the rest of the world
MEGAN IACOBINI DE FAZIO

When Innocent fled his native Democratic Republic of the Congo and arrived in the Kakuma refugee camp in 2009, he felt as if he couldn’t have been any further from the rest of the world. “There is no university in Kakuma, but the internet gave us a virtual campus and we were able to further our education,” says Innocent, who was awarded a diploma in liberal arts with a major in business. Inspired by his love of art, Innocent created a website to connect artists in Kakuma to the outside world: “I know so many talented artists, but they used to be desperate because they couldn’t make a living off their art.” Through Innocent’s website, Kakuma’s refugee artists are able to showcase their creations and sell them online, giving them access to a whole world beyond the camp.

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THE 15-YEAR-OLD FEMALE PRESIDENT
Tyler Riewer

“I was chosen because I know how to read and write.” Natalia responds. “But also because I can maintain progress.” Her committee members nod in agreement, and it becomes clear that Natalia is not your average 15-year-old.

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These Local Journalists are Fighting for Clean Water for Their Communities
SIWI - Stockholm International Water Institute

When Pakistani journalist Farahnaz Zahidi learnt about a water contamination crisis in the village of Tharparkar, she didn’t stop reporting until authorities took action. Farahnaz wrote extensively about an entire village that walks bent over due to fluorosis and water contamination. She used Facebook, Twitter and other social media to draw the public’s attention and put pressure on the government. Her stories and relentless efforts led to Pakistan’s Armed Forces and development sector finally setting up water plants in the village.

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Why This Super Woman Grows Super Foods for Her Community
Megan Gieske

The townships surrounding Cape Town, South Africa, can be described as a “food desert,” where fresh fruit and vegetables are not available. Where concrete has now paved over any gardens or green spaces, except for one in Gugulethu. Ntombi Mbinda, the force behind the garden, invites students to learn tending, best practices for nutrition, and empowers them to invest in their community.“If you eat healthy, you can make a difference,” she says, “and I really know I’m making a difference. I know what I’m doing helps people.”

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